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Three Vicente Sederberg Attorneys Included in National Law Journal’s 2019 List of ‘Cannabis Law Trailblazers’

PRESS RELEASE

Six VS attorneys have received the recognition since the publication began publishing the list last year

DENVER — The 2019 list of “Cannabis Law Trailblazers” published this month by National Law Journal includes three attorneys from Vicente Sederberg LLC: Adam Fine, Shawn Hauser, and Valerio Romano.

The annual “Cannabis Law Trailblazers” list was launched in 2018 and highlights the most accomplished and influential attorneys serving the cannabis industry. Last year, it included VS partner Josh Kappel and founding partners Christian Sederberg and Brian Vicente, making VS the most recognized firm on the list in its first two years.

“This kind of professional recognition is only possible with the confidence of our clients and colleagues,” Vicente said. “We are grateful for their support and for the opportunities to work on matters that inspire us.”

About the three VS attorneys included in National Law Journal’s 2019 list of “Cannabis Law Trailblazers”:

Adam Fine is managing partner of VS’s Boston office, where he represents several successful Massachusetts cannabis businesses and prospective business licensees on corporate, licensing, and regulatory matters. He is a leading voice on cannabis law and policy in the Commonwealth, and in 2018 he was named one of the “100 Most Influential People in Boston” by Boston magazine. 

Shawn Hauser is a partner and chair of the VS Hemp and Cannabinoids Practice Group. She is based in the firm’s Denver office, where she advises clients on the unique legal landscape governing cannabinoids and industrial hemp. She is also a member of the Hemp Industries Association Legislative Review Committee and the steering committee for the American Hemp Campaign. She has been named one of “Denver’s Top Lawyers” by 5280 magazine in each of the past four years.

Shawn Hauser is a partner and chair of the VS Hemp and Cannabinoids Practice Group. She is based in the firm’s Denver office, where she advises clients on the unique legal landscape governing cannabinoids and industrial hemp. She is also a member of the Hemp Industries Association Legislative Review Committee and the steering committee for the American Hemp Campaign. She has been named one of “Denver’s Top Lawyers” by 5280 magazine in each of the past four years. 

Valerio Romano is a partner in VS’s Boston office, where he focuses his practice on all aspects of land use and municipal law. He has worked to site cannabis businesses across Massachusetts and around the country since 2012, representing numerous licensees and prospective licensees from the Berkshires to Cape Cod.

About Vicente Sederberg LLC 

Vicente Sederberg LLC is one of the nation’s leading firms specializing in cannabis law and policy. It offers a full suite of services for all types of marijuana and hemp businesses, ancillary businesses, investors, trade associations, and governmental bodies. The firm is headquartered in Denver and has offices in Boston, Jacksonville, Los Angeles, and New York.

Since its founding in 2010, VS has helped shape marijuana and hemp laws and policies across the U.S. and around the world, and it has assisted clients in obtaining cannabis business licenses in more than 15 states. VS was recognized by Rolling Stone magazine as “the country’s first powerhouse marijuana law firm.”

For more information about VS, visit https://VicenteSederberg.com.

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